Can you get infected from mosquitoes or other insects that suck blood?
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Author Topic: Can you get infected from mosquitoes or other insects that suck blood?  (Read 5047 times)
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« on: May 20, 2015, 07:13:53 pm »

Can you get infected from mosquitoes or other insects that suck blood?
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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2015, 07:54:13 pm »



Yes, you can get an infection.

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« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2015, 12:41:34 am »

"Blood-sucking insects transmit many of the most debilitating diseases in humans, including malaria, sleeping sickness, filariasis, leishmaniasis, dengue, typhus and plague. In addition, these insects cause major economic losses in agriculture both by direct damage to livestock and as a result of the veterinary diseases, such as the various trypanosomiases, that they transmit. "

But please don't  Crazy?
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2015, 12:59:45 am »

Can you get infected from mosquitoes or other insects that suck blood?

"There are a number of reasons why mosquitoes cannot transmit HIV.

Firstly the mosquitoes’ mouth parts do not operate like a hypodermic needle. The tube which injects the host with saliva is separate from the canal which the mosquito uses to suck blood from the same host. Therefore blood only flows into the mosquito and only saliva is injected; blood is not flushed out of the same canal.

Insect-borne diseases like Encephalitis and malaria are spread because they multiply within the mosquito, these diseases then move into the insect’s salivary glands and are injected into the host with the saliva. If a mosquito feeds on an HIV-positive person the virus cannot survive and replicate within the mosquito’s gut as HIV requires specialist cells found only in humans in order to multiply . HIV is treated as food and digested.

HIV circulates in the blood at lower levels than malaria and other inset-borne diseases. The mosquito does not take enough units of HIV from the infected person to initiate infection.

Even if it was possible for the mosquito to inject HIV into an uninfected person, the person would have to be bitten by ten million mosquitoes who had previously been feeding on an HIV positive host in order to receive one unit of HIV. For this reason squashing or accidentally swallowing a mosquito does not put one at risk of contracting HIV, because there is not enough HIV positive blood within the mosquito for a person to contract the disease." http://www.mediaaids.org/content/page/mosquitoes_can_transmit_hiv_aids
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« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2015, 03:27:52 am »

Interesting question because i had this question a few days a go, can those buggers infect with aids?  Grin
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« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2015, 09:51:40 am »

Yeah, I'm pretty sure you can.
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« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2015, 08:02:06 pm »

Can you get infected from mosquitoes or other insects that suck blood?

"There are a number of reasons why mosquitoes cannot transmit HIV.

Firstly the mosquitoes’ mouth parts do not operate like a hypodermic needle. The tube which injects the host with saliva is separate from the canal which the mosquito uses to suck blood from the same host. Therefore blood only flows into the mosquito and only saliva is injected; blood is not flushed out of the same canal.

Insect-borne diseases like Encephalitis and malaria are spread because they multiply within the mosquito, these diseases then move into the insect’s salivary glands and are injected into the host with the saliva. If a mosquito feeds on an HIV-positive person the virus cannot survive and replicate within the mosquito’s gut as HIV requires specialist cells found only in humans in order to multiply . HIV is treated as food and digested.

HIV circulates in the blood at lower levels than malaria and other inset-borne diseases. The mosquito does not take enough units of HIV from the infected person to initiate infection.

Even if it was possible for the mosquito to inject HIV into an uninfected person, the person would have to be bitten by ten million mosquitoes who had previously been feeding on an HIV positive host in order to receive one unit of HIV. For this reason squashing or accidentally swallowing a mosquito does not put one at risk of contracting HIV, because there is not enough HIV positive blood within the mosquito for a person to contract the disease." http://www.mediaaids.org/content/page/mosquitoes_can_transmit_hiv_aids

Facinating. I learn something new every day Smiley Tempted to do a bit more research regarding this idea but I'm a bit too lazy atm....
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« Reply #7 on: May 22, 2015, 01:46:32 am »

 Grin me too i feel lazy too
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2015, 04:46:31 am »

Yes, quite a few infections....West Nile, Malaria etc.
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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2015, 05:48:53 am »

Interesting question because i had this question a few days a go, can those buggers infect with aids?  Grin

AID's if the effect of being infected with HIV.
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« Reply #10 on: July 21, 2015, 05:00:16 am »

i guess only malaria can infect humans from mosquito
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« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2015, 10:01:31 pm »

only malaria that can infect human by mosqitos
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« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2015, 10:35:45 pm »


One of the most prevalent myths about HIV transmission is that mosquitoes or other bloodsucking insects can infect you. There is no scientific evidence to support this claim. To see why mosquitos don't aid in the transmission of HIV, we can look at the insect's biting behavior.

When a mosquito bites someone, it does not inject its own blood or the blood of an animal or person it has bitten into the next person it bites. The mosquito does inject saliva, which acts as a lubricant so that it can feed more effectively. Yellow fever and malaria can be transmitted through the saliva, but HIV does not reproduce in insects, so the virus doesn't survive in the mosquito long enough to be transmitted in the saliva.

Additionally, mosquitoes don't normally travel from one person to another after ingesting blood. The insects need time to digest the blood meal before moving on.

 Wink


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