An interesting take on LGBT folks in Hinduism
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Author Topic: An interesting take on LGBT folks in Hinduism  (Read 78 times)
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« on: February 14, 2018, 09:29:13 pm »

I was raised Hindu, and am an atheist now. But I do find Hinduism's stance regarding LGBT issues very interesting. There is no clarity (unlike say Christianity or Islam), so there are many ways of interpreting scriptures. One of the more interesting ones is from the Rigveda, one of the four canonical sacred texts of Hinduism. It says 'Vikruti Evam Prakriti'  which means perversity/diversity is what nature is all about, and what seems unnatural is also natural.

I find that to be a beautiful sentiment, one that I haven't seen many religions take.
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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2018, 05:19:46 pm »

I was raised Hindu, and am an atheist now. But I do find Hinduism's stance regarding LGBT issues very interesting. There is no clarity (unlike say Christianity or Islam), so there are many ways of interpreting scriptures. One of the more interesting ones is from the Rigveda, one of the four canonical sacred texts of Hinduism. It says 'Vikruti Evam Prakriti'  which means perversity/diversity is what nature is all about, and what seems unnatural is also natural.

I find that to be a beautiful sentiment, one that I haven't seen many religions take.

Are there any scriptures in Hinduism which you'd interpret as... homophobic? Explicitly or implicitly.
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2018, 10:19:26 pm »

There is a rather esoteric bit buried in, which lists 12 (or maybe it was 15) types of "men who are not men", including "men who have vaginas", "men who use their mouths as vaginas", "men who use their ass as vaginas" etc.
It is tough to say whether it's homophobic or whether it embraces homosexuality, since it does not advocate hatred for said categories, and maybe legitimises them by acknowledgement. It could also be interpreted as saying that these are not "real men," and is perhaps meant to deprive them of patriarchal authority.

Hinduism has been trans- friendly, with gods/deities taking transgender forms, incarnating in opposite genders, lusting said opposite-gendered incarnation etc. Trans communities have traditionally been acknowledged, respected, and given space in society.

Unfortunately, some very popular religious figures are now marketing their yoga retreats as un-gaying centres. They get away with classifying homosexuality as a disease because it is not directly mentioned at all in scripture. And Hinduism is generally used as a tool for oppression by politicians today, who interpret it to cater to their political ends.
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