What is the USA political system hierarchy?
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« on: May 29, 2020, 07:12:43 pm »

I am getting confused with all the roles in the federal government and political hierarchy.
Can someone please explain which role is above each? (add any role if I missed any)

my guess is: (from bottom to top)

1. Sheriff
2. Governor
3. Mayor
4. Congressman
5. Senator
6. President of the US

Thanks
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2020, 07:42:53 pm »

Mayor
Sheriff
County Mayor
State Congressman/Representative
State Senator
Lt Governor
Governor
US Congressman/Representative
US Senator
Vice President
President
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2020, 09:28:40 pm »

Mayor
Sheriff
County Mayor
State Congressman/Representative
State Senator
Lt Governor
Governor
US Congressman/Representative
US Senator
Vice President
President


Thanks!
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2020, 02:31:09 am »

Brother Raphjd pretty much nailed it, although there are few complexities to the wiring diagram:

The 10th Amendment to the US Constitution (1791) says the Federal (US) government only has the powers assigned to it by the Constitution; all other powers belong to individual state governments.  Some applications of this are clear:  Only the Federal government can raise an army and declare war on a foreign power, but it cannot set the speed limit on motorways within a state.  There's often controversy on how this concept is applied...for example, several years ago the Federal department of transportation did not want states to have motorway speed limits higher than 70 miles/hr (113 km/hr), but it couldn't do this by a law, so it said there would no Federal funds for motorway construction in states that had higher speed limits.  The states all dropped their speed limits.

At the congressional level, while the Senate seems more "powerful" than the House of Representatives, all legislation about spending money from the Federal budget has to start in the House of Representatives.

And then there are some interesting exceptions:  San Francisco (California) has a single government for both city and county functions.  Carrying that farther, the District of Columbia (not a state, but sort of like one) has a single government that does city, county, and state functions.  But since it's not a "state," it does not have voting representation in the Congress, even though its residents pay full Federal taxes every year.  As you can imagine, this causes much discussion.

This is more than you wanted to read, but since I'm trapped at home, I tend to type a lot  Smiley
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2020, 08:52:27 am »

Mayor
Sheriff
County Mayor
State Congressman/Representative
State Senator
Lt Governor
Governor
US Congressman/Representative
US Senator
Vice President
President


What is the difference between
State Congressman/Representative and US Congressman/Representative? I know that there are two senators per state and 438 congressmen. which of the 438 are State and which are US?
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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2020, 10:52:57 am »

Individual states have their own houses of assembly. The US is a federation.
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